Barnes Ph.D, Kathleen C.

Barnes

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Department of Medicine

Division of Allergy & Clinical Immunology

Johns Hopkins Asthma & Allergy Center

5501 Hopkins Bayview Circle, Rm. 3A.62A

Baltimore, MD 21224-6801

Tel:  410-550-2071

Fax:  410-550-2130

Email: kbarnes@jhmi.edu


Biography:

Dr. Kathleen Barnes is Professor of Medicine and Mary Beryl Patch Turnbull Scholar in the Division of Allergy & Clinical Immunology Department of Medicine, with joint appointments in the Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine and the Department of Epidemiology at the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. She received her Ph.D. in biomedical anthropology with a concentration on immunology, environmental epidemiology, and medical entomology at the University of Florida in Gainesville.  She began her fellowship in immunogenetics at the Johns Hopkins Asthma and Allergy Center in 1993, working closely with the late Dr. David Marsh in conducting population studies on the genetics of asthma and allergic disease in ethnically diverse populations.  Two years later she joined the faculty and currently is Director of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center Genetics Research Facility and Lowe Family Genomics Core.  She also maintains a research unit at the Chronic Disease Research Centre in Barbados. 

Her work focuses on the genetic basis for acute and chronic airway disease and is based on family-based and independent clinical populations, largely of African descent, recruited both locally and from various locales in the Caribbean and South America. Her studies are also focused on gene-environment interactions and the interface of innate and adaptive immunity in the immunogenetics of various complex lung, allergic, rheumatologic and infectious diseases, including asthma, pulmonary hypertension, scleroderma, atopic dermatitis and schistosomiasis. In addition, she has had a long-standing interest in the potential beneficial role of microbial exposures for the development of asthma, allergies and autoimmune disorders, or the ‘hygiene hypothesis’. She has been continuously funded by various NIH institutes (NHLBI, NIAID, NHGRI) and has led multiple multi-center programs.  She has multiple civic duties including membership on the Division of Allergy & Clinical Immunology’s executive committee, the Bayview Advisory Board, and the Department of Medicine's Appointments and Promotions Committee, and has held leadership roles in the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.  She has served on Study Section at the NIH since 2005. Dr. Barnes has mentored multiple predoctoral and postdoctoral students, has served on over a dozen thesis committees, and has mentored students participating in the T-35 NIH Multidisciplinary Fellowship Training Program through the Pulmonary division continuously since 2000.

 

Research Interest:  Immunogenetics and genetic epidemiology of complex lung diseases and diseases of allergy and inflammation, the genetic basis for health disparities, the evolutionary basis for the development of allergic disease, the Hygiene Hypothesis in the context of allergic disease and helminthic infections.

 

Current Research:  Dr. Barnes currently leads two multicenter, international genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including one for asthma in 1,000 African American asthma cases and non-asthmatic controls from the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, and 1,000 African Caribbean asthmatics and their family members from Barbados, which comprise the consortium on Genomic Research on Asthma in the African Diaspora (GRAAD), which is part of the North American-based EVE consortium, (a meta-analysis of nine GWAS’s for asthma).   She also leads the Johns Hopkins team in three RC2s aimed towards follow-up on the EVE Consortium meta-analysis on asthma.  She leads the genetic/genomic component in the NIAID-sponsored ‘Atopic Dermatitis Research Network’, a program designed to elucidate mechanisms for viral (i.e., eczema vaccinatum, eczema herpeticum) and bacterial skin infections in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD).  As Director of two cores (genetics, genomics) in the Johns Hopkins Department of Medicine, and co-PI of a whole-exome sequencing program which includes an African American cohort selected for asthma, she has considerable expertise in high-throughput, cutting edge technologies aimed towards identification of novel variants associated with these traits in admixed populations. 

 

Selected Publications:

Barnes KC, Neely JD, Duffy  DL, Freidhoff LR, Breazeale DR, Schou C, Naidu RP, Levett PN, Renault B, Kucherlapati R, Iozzino S, Ehrlich E, Beaty TH,  Marsh DG.   Linkage of asthma and total serum IgE concentration to markers on chromosome 12q:  Evidence from Afro-Caribbean and Caucasian populations. Genomics. 1996; 37: 41-50.

CSGA (Collaborative Studies on the Genetics of Asthma).  A genome-wide search for asthma susceptibility loci in ethnically diverse populations.  Nature Genetics.  1997; 15: 389-92.

Lonjou C, Barnes KC, Chen H, Cookson WO, Deichmann KA, Hall IP, Holloway JW, Laitinen T, Palmer LJ, Wjst M,  Morton NE.  A first trial of retrospective collaboration for positional cloning in complex inheritance: assay of the cytokine region on chromosome 5 by the Consortium On Asthma Genetics (COAG).  Proc Natl Acad Sci USA.  2000; 97(20): 10942‑7.

Liang KY, Hsu FC, Beaty TH, Barnes KC.  Multipoint linkage disequilibrium mapping approach based on the case-parent trio design.  Am. J. Hum. Genet.  2001; 68: 937-950.

Becker KG, Barnes KC, Bright TJ, Wang SA.  The Genetic Association Database.  Nat Genet.  2004; 36(5): 431-32.

Pillai SG, Cousens DJ, Barnes AA, Buckley PT, Chiano MN, Hosking LK, Cameron L-A, Fling ME, Foley JJ, Green A, Sarau HM, Schmidt DB, Sprankle CS, Blumenthal MN, Vestbo J, Kennedy-Wilson K, Wisted WE, Wagner MJ, Anderson WH, investigators of the GAIN Network, Ignar DM.  A coding polymorphism in the CYSLT2 receptor with reduced affinity to LTD4 is associated with asthma.  Pharmacogenetics.  2004; 14: 627-33.

Zambelli-Weiner A, Ehrlich E, Stockton ML, Grant AV, Zhang S, Levett PN, Beaty TH, Barnes KC.  Evaluation of the CD14/-260 polymorphism and house dust endotoxin exposure in the Barbados asthma genetics study.  J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.  2005; 115: 1203-9.

Lima JJ, Zhang S, Grant A, Shao L, Tantisira KG, Allayee H, Wang J, Sylvester J, Holbrook J, Wise R, Weiss ST, Barnes K.  Influence of leukotriene pathway polymorphisms on response to montelukast in asthma.  Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2006; 173: 379-85.

Barnes KC, Grant A, Gao P, Baltadjieva D, Berg Tiina, Chi P, Zhang S, Zambelli-Weiner A, Ehrlich E, Zardkoohi O, Brummet ME, Stockton M, Watkins T, Gao L, Gittens M, Wills-Karp M, Cheadle C, Beck LA, Beaty TH, Becker KG, Garcia JGN, Mathias RA.  Polymorphisms in the novel gene Acyloxyacyl Hydroxylase (AOAH) are associated with asthma and associated phenotypes.  J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2006; 118: 70-7.

Barnes KC.  Genetic epidemiology of health disparities in allergy and clinical immunology.  J Allergy Clin Immunol.  2006; 117: 243-54.

Gao L, Grant AV, Rafaels N, Stockton-Porter M, Watkins T, Gao P, Chi P, Munoz M, Watson H, Dunston G, Togias A, Hansel N, Sevransky J, Maloney JP, Moss M, Shanholtz C, Brower R, Garcia JGN, Grigoryev DN, Cheadle C, Beaty TH, Mathias RA, Barnes KC.  Polymorphisms in the myosin light chain kinase gene that confer risk of severe sepsis are associated with a lower risk of asthma.  J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007; 119: 1111-8.

Cheadle C, Watkins T, Fan J, Williams MA, Georas S,  Hall J, Rosen A, Barnes KC.  GSMA: Gene Set Matrix Analysis, an automated method for rapid hypothesis testing of gene expression data. Bioinformatics and Biology Insights.  2007; 1:49-62.

Grigoryev DN, Mathai SC, Fisher MR, Girgis RE, Zaiman AL, Housten-Harris T, Cheadle C, Gao L, Hummers LK, Champion HC, Garcia JGN, Wigley FM, Tuder RM, Barnes KC, Hassoun PM.  Identification of candidate genes in scleroderma-related pulmonary arterial hypertension.  Translational Research 2008; 151:197-207.

Harris ML, Darrah E, Lam GK, Bartlett SJ, Giles JT, Grant AV, Gao P, Scott WW, El- Gabalawy H, Casciola-Rosen L, Barnes KC, Bathon JM, Rosen A.  Association of autoimmunity to Peptidyl Arginine Deiminase Type 4 with genotype and disease severity in rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis & Rheumatism 2008; 58:1958-67.

Wurfel MM, Gordon AC, Holden TD, Radella F, Strout J, Kajikawa O, Ruzinski JT, Rona G, Black RA, Stratton S, Jarvik GP, Hajjar AM, Nickerson DA, Rieder M, Sevransky J,Maloney JP, Moss M, Martin G, Shanholtz C, Garcia JGN, Gao L, Brower R, Barnes KC,Walley KR, Russell JA, Martin TR.  Toll-like receptor 1 polymorphisms affect innate  immune responses and outcomes in sepsis.  Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008; 178:710-20.

Grant AV, Araujo MI, Ponte EV, Oliveira RR, Cruz AA, Barnes KC, Beaty TH.  High Heritability but uncertain mode of inheritance for total serum IgE level and Schistosomamansoni infection intensity in a Schistosomiasis-endemic Brazilian population.  J Infect Dis. 2008; 198:1227-36.

Vergara C, Tsai YJ, Grant AV, Rafaels N, Gao L, Hand T, Stockton M, Campbell M, Mercado D, Faruque M, Dunston G, Beaty TH, Oliveira RR, Ponte EV, Cruz AA, Carvalho E, Araujo MI, Watson H, Schleimer RP, Caraballo L, Nickel RG, Mathias RA, Barnes KC. Gene encoding Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines is associated with asthma and IgE in three populations. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008; 178:1017-22.

Hansel NN, Gao L, Rafaels NM, Mathias RA, Neptune ER, Tankersley C, Grant AV, Connett J, Beaty TH, Wise RA, Barnes KC.  Leptin receptor polymorphisms and lung function decline in COPD.  Eur Resp J, 2009; 34:103-10.

Price AL, Tandon A, Patterson N, Barnes KC, Rafaels N, Ruczinski I, Beaty TH, Mathias R, Reich D, Myers S. Sensitive detection of chromosomal segments of distinct ancestry in admixed populations. PLoS Genet. 2009; 5(6):e1000519.doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1000519.

Beck LA, Boguniewicz M, Hata T, Schneider LC, Hanifin J, Gallo R, Paller AS, Lieff S, Reese J, Zaccaro D, Milgrom H, Barnes KC, Leung DYM.  Phenotype of atopic dermatitis subjects with a history of eczema herpeticum.  J Allergy Clin Immunol.  2009; 124:260-9.

Gao P, Rafaels NM, Hand T, Murray T, Boguniewicz M, Hata T, Schneider L, Hanifin JM,  Gallo RL, Gao L, Beaty TH, Beck LA, Barnes KC, Leung DYM.  Filaggrin mutations that confer risk of atopic dermatitis confer greater risk for eczema herpeticum.  J Allergy Clin  Immunol. 2009; 124:507-13.

Barnes KC.  An update on the genetics of atopic dermatitis: Scratching the surface in 2009. J. Allergy Clin Immunology 2010; 125:16-29.

Mathias RA, Grant AV, Rafaels N, Hand T, Gao L, Vergara C, Tsai YJ, Yang M, Campbell M, Foster C, Gao P, Togias A, Hansel NN, Diette G, Adkinson NF, Liu MC, Faruque M, Dunston GM, Watson HR, Bracken MB, Hoh J, Maul P, Maul T, Jedlicka AE, Murray T, Hetmanski JB, Ashworth R, Ongaco CM, Hetrick KN, Doheny KF, Pugh EW, Ford J, Eng

        C, Burchard EG, Sleiman PMA, Hakonarson H, Forno E, Raby BA, Weiss ST, Scott AF,

        Kabesch M, Liang L, Abecasis G, Moffatt MF, Cookson WOC, Ruczinski I, Beaty TH,

        Barnes KC.  A genome-wide association study on African-ancestry populations for asthma.

        J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010; 125:336-46.e4.

Sleiman PM, Flory J, Imielinski M, Bradfield JP, Annaiah K, Willis-Owen SA, Wang K,

       Rafaels NM, Michel S, Bonnelykke K, Zhang H, Kim CE, Frackelton EC, Glessner JT, Hou

       C, Otieno FG, Santa E, Thomas K, Smith RM, Glaberson WR, Garris M, Chiavacci RM,

       Beaty TH, Ruczinski I, Orange JM, Allen J, Spergel JM, Grundmeier R, Mathias RA,

       Christie JD, von Mutius E, Cookson WO, Kabesch M, Moffatt MF, Grunstein MM, Barnes

       KC, Devoto M, Magnusson M, Li H, Grant SF, Bisgaard H, Hakonarson H.  Variants of

       DENND1B associated with asthma in children.  N Engl J Med. 2010; 362:36-44.

Cornelis MC, Agrawal A, Cole JW, Hansel NN, Barnes KC, Beaty TH, Bennett SN, Bierut

       LJ, Boerwinkle E, Doheny KF, Feenstra B, Feingold E, Fornage M, Haiman CA, Harris EL,

       Hayes MG, Heit JA, Hu FB, Kang JH, Laurie CC Ling H, Manolio TA, Marazita ML,

       Mathias RA, Mirel DB, Paschall J, Pasquale LR, Pugh EW, Rice JP, Udren J, van Dam RM,

       Wang X, Wiggs JL, Williams K, Yu K; for the GENEVA Consortium.  The gene,

       environment association studies consortium (GENEVA): maximizing the knowledge

       obtained from GWAS by collaboration across studies of multiple conditions.  Genet

       Epidemiol 2010; 34:364-72.

Murray T, Beaty TH, Mathias RA, Rafaels N, Grant AV, Faruque MU, Watson HR,

       Ruczinski I, Dunston GM, Barnes KC.  African and non-African admixture components in

       African Americans and an African Caribbean population.  Genet Epidemiol. 2010; 34:561-8.

Hansel NN, Sidhaye V, Rafaels NM, Gao L, Gao P, Williams R, Connett JE, Beaty TH, Mathias RA, Wise RA, King LS, Barnes KC.  Aquaporin 5 polymorphisms and rate of lung function decline in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.  PLoS One.  2010; 5(12):e14226.

Grant AV, Araujo MI, Ponte EV, Oliveira RR, Cruz AA, Barnes KC, Beaty TH.

        Polymorphisms in IL10 are associated with total immunoglobulin E levels and Schistosoma

        mansoni infection intensity in a Brazilian population.  Genes & Immun, 2011; 12(1):46-50.

De Benedetto A, Rafaels NM, McGirt LY, Ivanov AI, Georas SN, Cheadle C, Berger AE, Zhang K, Vidyasagar S, Yoshida T, Boguniewicz M, Hata T, Schneider LC, Hanifin JM, Gallo RL, Novak N, Weidinger S, Beaty TH, Leung DY, Barnes KC, Beck LA.  Tight junction defects in patients with atopic dermatitis. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011; 127:773-86. 

Leung DYM, Gao PS, Grigoryev DN, Rafaels NM, Streib JE, Howell MD, Taylor PA, Boguniewicz M, Canniff J, Armstrong B, Zaccaro DJ, Schneider LC, Hata TR, Hanifin JM, Beck LA, Weinberg A, Barnes KC.  Human atopic dermatitis complicated by eczema herpeticum is associated with abnormalities in IFN-γ response.  J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2011; 127:965-73. 

Torgerson DG, Ampleford EJ, Chiu GY, Gauderman WJ, Gignoux CR, Graves PE et al.  Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of asthma in ethnically diverse North American populations. Nat Genet, 2011; doi:10.1038/ng.888.

Wegmann D, Kessner DE, Veeramah KR, Mathias RA, Nicolae DL, Yanek LR, Sun Y, Torgerson DG, Rafaels N, Mosley T, Becker LC, Ruczinski I, Beaty TH, Kardia SLR, Meyers DA, Barnes KC, Becker DM, Freimer NB, Novembre J.  Recombination rates in admixed individuals identified by ancestry-based inference.  Nat Genet.  2011;doi:10.1038/ng.894.

 Mentor List:

·       Pre-Doctoral:

26 pre-doctoral students, including 6 students from the Howard County Technology Magnet Program (2004-present), and 10 students from the NIH-supported T35 Minority Summer Internship Program hosted by the Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care Medicine, (2005-present)

 

·        Post-Doctoral:

Lili Barouch, M.D.

Position: Johns Hopkins Department of Medicine Mentoring Program Mentee

Dates: 1999 – 2001

Current Position & Institution: Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University

 

Luis Caraballo, M.D., Ph.D.

Position: Visiting Scientist

Dates: 2000 – 2001

Current Position & Institution: Professor of Medicine, University of Cartagena, Colombia

 

Silvia Jimenez

Position: Visiting Scientist

Dates: 2000 – 2001

Current Position & Institution: Scientist, University of Cartagena, Colombia

 

Katherine Held, Ph.D.

Position: Post-doctoral Fellow

Dates: 2000 – 2003

Current Position & Institution: Unknown

 

Daniela Baltadjieva, M.D., Ph.D.

Position: Visiting Scientist

Dates: 2003 – 2004

Current Position & Institution:  Associate Professor, Central Lab for Clinical Immunology,

“Aleksandrovska” University Hospital, Sofia, Bulgaria

 

Melba Muñoz, M.D.

Position: Post-doctoral Fellow

Dates: 2003 – 2005

Current Position & Institution: Doctoral Student, Max Planck Institute for Infectious Biology, Berlin, Germany

Recipient of American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Travel Grant 2004, 2005

                       

April Zambelli-Weiner, Ph.D.

Position: Post-doctoral Fellow

Dates: 2003 – 2004

Current Position & Institution: Epidemiology International

                       

Nadia Hansel, MD, MPH

Current Position:  Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University 

Dates:  2000 – 2003

Recipient of K23 award entitled “Genetics of Asthma Severity & Lung Function Decline” 

 

Candelaria Vergara, MD, PhD

Position:  Post-doctoral Fellow

Dates:  2004 – 2005, 2006 – 2007

Current Position & Institution: Research Associate, Johns Hopkins University

 

Li Gao, MD, PhD

Current Position:  Instructor of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

Dates:  2005 – 2009

Recipient of 2006 AAAAI Interest Section Award Grant

 

Peisong Gao, MD, PhD

Current Position:  Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins University

Dates:  2002 – 2005

Recipient of 2007 AAAAI Interest Section Award Grant

 

Dmitry Grigoryev, MD, PhD

Current Position:  Instructor in Medicine, Johns Hopkins University

Dates:  2002 – 2005

Recipient of National Kidney Foundation Young Investigator Grant, 2006

 

Jinshui Fan, MD, PhD

Current Position:  Research Associate, Johns Hopkins University

Dates:  2004 – 2007

 

Yuh-Jung (John) Tsai, MD

Current Position:  Private practice, San Francisco, CA

Dates:  2006 – 2009

Recipient of David G. Marsh Genetics of Asthma & Allergic Diseases Award, 2007

Recipient of JACI Developing Researcher Award, 2007

 

Brian G. Kral, MD, MPH

Current Position:  Assistant Professor; Director, GeneSTAR ENIGMA Research Program, Johns Hopkins University

Dates:  2009 – present

Recipient of K23 award

 

Camila Fontana, PhD

Current Position:  Postdoctoral Fellow, Johns Hopkins University

Dates:  2011 – present

Recipient of David G. Marsh Genetics of Asthma & Allergic Diseases Award, 2011

 

 

Other Information:  

 

In addition to Dr. Barnes’ sponsored research, she is Program Director of both the Johns Hopkins Bayview Genetics Research Facility (BGRF) & The Lowe Family Genomics Core, with a mission to establish a self-sustaining research program establish a sustainable Genetics and Genomics facility for both self-initiated studies as well as studies initiated by colleagues in the Divisions of allergy & clinical immunology, pulmonary medicine, rheumatology, vascular medicine, and geriatrics on the Bayview Campus (complements the Bayview Center for Innovative Medicine).

     

 

The BGRF is led by Dr. Candelaria Vergara, MD, PhD, highly skilled in statistical and population genetics. Dr. Vergara has been a long-time collaborator of Dr. Barnes on studies of quantitative traits (e.g., IgE) and other phenotypes related to complex lung disease as a member of her former team work in Colombia. She completed her doctoral dissertation on the relationship of African ancestry and asthma and allergies as part of her thesis "Genetic risk factors for asthma and high IgE in African descent populations: Impact of admixture in the association of polymorphism in ADAM33 with asthma and IgE levels in a population of the Caribbean Coast of Colombia" in November 2008, after which she assumed her position in the BGRF.  The Bayview Genetic Reseach Facility provides basic molecular genetic services including project design and development, high-powered SNP and STRs, sample processing, storage, and shipment, nucleic acid extraction from whole blood and other potential DNA sources, and biobanking services.  Genotyping is performed using industry-leading tools such as llumina’s BeadStudio, Infinium iScan and Applied Biosystems sequence analyzers, integrating advanced data management features and extensive reporting capabilities. In addition, we provide customized data analysis, presentation and interpretation of results as part of Dr. Barnes’ Data Analysis Core (DAC).

 

The Lowe Family Genomics Core is led by Dr. Chris Cheadle, PhD. Since undertaking this position in 2005, the Microarray Facility, under Dr. Cheadle’s leadership, has expanded its platform capabilities to provide lower cost gene expression profiling using the new Illumina BeadArray technology.  We have demonstrated the comparability of the lower cost Illumina BeadArray gene expression microarrays relative to the then industry leading Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays [Cheadle C, Becker KG, Cho-Chung, Y-s, Nesterova M, Watkins T, Wood W, Prabu V, and KC Barnes. (2006)  A rapid method for microarray cross platform comparisons using gene expression signatures.  Mol Cell Probes, 21(1):35-46].  The Genomics Core has successfully implemented the widespread use of this technology having processed over 3,000 Illumina arrays for more than 130 individual projects since this service was first offered in January 2006 and, as such, has become one of the largest service providers for this technology in the USA.  In addition to conventional microarray services, the Lowe Family Genomics Core performs Illumina array work for transcription profiling using FFPE samples, and offers a full range of quantitative RT-PCR validation services using the Applied Biosystems TaqMan assay system with an ABI Prism® 7300 reader.  Our Core is fully staffed and includes a bio-informatics team and in-house expertise for use of publicly available and commercial software packages.

 

 

Other Faculty:

                                                                                                                                         

Dr. Li Gao, MD, PhD is an Instructor of Medicine and molecular geneticist in Dr. Barnes’ Bayview Genetics Research Facility. As a postdoctoral fellow at Medical College of Wisconsin, she conducted genetic linkage studies mapping complex cardiovascular traits such as hypertension using rat models. Since joining the Johns Hopkins Department of Medicine in 2002, her work has expanded to include genetic epidemiology of complex lung diseases, with a particular focus on acute lung injury, pulmonary hypertension and asthma. A major area of Dr. Gao’s research is the identification of co-associations of variants in multiple candidate genes for diverse clinical phenotypes, most notably co-associations between sepsis-associated acute lung injury and asthma and schistosomiasis and asthma.

 

 

Dr. Rasika Mathias, ScD is an Assistant Professor of Dr. Rasika Mathias, ScD is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Divisions of General Internal Medicine and Allergy and Clinical Immunology. She is a formally trained Genetic Epidemiologist with a particular emphasis on the genetics of quantitative traits underlying disease phenotypes in the context of families. She has spent over a decade investigating the role of genetics in asthma risk with specific focus on populations of African ancestry. She is the lead Genetic Epidemiologist for multiple family-based genome-wide association studies on both asthma and cardiovascular disease and has made contributions in both methodological and applied aspects of high-throughput statistical genetics. She has extensive experience in the genetics of complex diseases in admixed populations, leading the first publication of a GWAS on subjects with African ancestry. More recently, she has focused on the role of rare genetic variants identified through next generation sequencing approaches in complex disease.Medicine in the Divisions of General Internal Medicine and Allergy and Clinical Immunology. She is a formally trained Genetic Epidemiologist with a particular emphasis on the genetics of quantitative traits underlying disease phenotypes in the context of families. She has spent over a decade investigating the role of genetics in asthma risk with specific focus on populations of African ancestry. She is the lead Genetic Epidemiologist for multiple family-based genome-wide association studies on both asthma and cardiovascular disease and has made contributions in both methodological and applied aspects of high-throughput statistical genetics. She has extensive experience in the genetics of complex diseases in admixed populations, leading the first publication of a GWAS on subjects with African ancestry. More recently, she has focused on the role of rare genetic variants identified through next generation sequencing approaches in complex disease.

 

 

All of the above studies are greatly facilitated by resources available to us at the Johns Hopkins Asthma & Allergy Center at the Bayview Campus.  In addition to our work conducted in 800 sq. ft. of wet laboratory space, much of our genotyping activities are conducted at the Genetic Research Core Facility (GRCF) (grcf.med.jhu.edu), a JHU service center, under the supervision and direction of Dr. Alan Scott at the new Canton Campus facility.  Clinical laboratory activities (e.g., phenotyping) are conducted in-house and genetic data analysis is conducted by our staff and faculty in the Data Analysis Core as part of the Center for Translational Respiratory Medicine and in collaboration with the analytical team at the Genetic Epidemiology unit, the Bloomberg School of Public Health.  In addition, two Registered Nurses conduct our studies off-campus at the Chronic Disease Research Centre in Barbados.

 

 

 

Updated ___8.12.11_________

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